Telemetry Abstracts Draw Interest at Experimental Biology 2015

 

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EndoGear telemetry drew healthy interest at this year's largest US research conference, Experimental Biology. Three EndoGear telemetry abstracts were presented. One, authored by Armon Davtyan from Transonic Endogear, Davis CA, reported on the development of a wireless power source for implantable telemetry devices to provide power for telemetry monitoring over extended periods of time. The Wireless Power Supply (WPS) uses inductive power technology to send power to an implanted 3-dimentional Wireless Power Receiver (WPR) that is used instead of the battery to provide continuous power to a telemetry system used in small animals such as rats.

A second EndoGear abstract, authored by Andreas Michaelides of Nicosia, Cyprus, reported on the development of remotely activated thrombus formation in the common carotid artery of awake rats as a model for studying the effects of thrombolytic and antithrombogenic agents on cerebral circulation. Rather than rely on mechanical occlusion that would lead to a gradual carotid occlusion, but requires additional surgery, the researchers developed a miniature cuff electrode (0.8mm ID) that could be used with an implantable Endogear telemetry system to induce a thrombus in the carotid arteries of awake rats. The telemetry system is capable of bidirectional user control and it can supply an excitation current to the cuff electrode to induce the thrombus formation at a user defined time interval after surgery.